Tag Archives: Star wars

Animating Lego – A Star Wars MicroFilm

Q: What do you do when you dig up a few old Lego Star Wars toys from the attic?

A: Immediately start story boarding a stop motion film, obviously.

For no other reason than to see if I could, I set myself the challenge of making a ‘Microfilm’ – A small but perfectly formed animation that was as filmic as I could manage. After a bit of testing and a few hours of shooting and editing this is the result.

If you’re wondering how this was made, here’s a shot to illustrate just how low tech the setup was. It’s all about cunning placement of cameras, macro lenses and very careful planning and measurements when it comes to tracking shots. IMG_2496

I used a Nikon D750 with a 35-70mm macro lens, a printed background of Liverpool docks and an assortment of paper clips and blu-tack to position the models. Whenever an object is thrown (or forced) in the film it has been shot with a paperclip support that is then painstakingly edited out of each frame. It’s a labour intensive task but I’m super happy with the results.

 

If you enjoyed this and want to see more then say hello! If you have any thoughts or suggestions leave a comment and follow jonhallphoto to see the next installment.

 

How do you improve an already awesome sword fight? …Lightsabers.

You may remember the Musketeers stage combat trailer from my last post. That was a video completed in one editing session to try to get it selling tickets as quickly as possible so I thought “how could I improve this with a painstakingly long and tedious process that will shut me away from the outside world for nearly a week?”

The answer?   Lightsabers.

It turns out that adding a bit of Jedi flair to your videos is pretty labour intensive work, requiring you to individually animate every frame of your light sabers. It takes forever.

I won’t go into too much detail here. If you want to have a go yourself I’ve added some useful links to the bottom of this post.

The effect is achieved using Adobe After Effects. Each saber is created by animating a mask across a coloured solid. Once all of the movement is complete, clashes and sound effects are added.

If you want to try your own, take a look at these tutorials and post your work in the comments section.